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. the authors recall the organizations cofounding by bobby seale and huey newton in oakland, california, in 1966, its proliferation of offices in over 60 cities across the country, and its political ideologies and inner workings. this is just under two hours. .. >> that really needed to happen. and i'd been an organizer a long time, and he said, you know, you really need to turn this into a bigger project, and we worked together on this for 14 years. he's been there every step, you know, it's been an amazing partnership, so thank you, waldo. i want to thank professor taylor for coming and moderating this event. i want to thank billy x who's here, the chair of alumni association. it's about tomb for the -- time for the black panther party and other former panther or members in the audience. and i want to give a very special thanks, i'm very honored, and we are very lucky to have here with us tonight chairman bobby seale, the founder with huey newton of the black panther party. and chairman seale is in the process of producing a film, and it's going to be a very important film. there have been sev
in cities throughout the country, l.a., san francisco, oakland, chicago, new york. a black power ferment of people asking how do we take the gains in the successes and the power of the civil rights movement and translate into that power that can challenge poverty. the civil rights movement have been tremendously successful at dismantling jim crow and dismantling segregation but what it didn't do was it didn't provide an insurgent means to transform poverty. it didn't provide a way to change ghettoization and it didn't reach the full goal to the participants in the civil rights movement of freedom and power. what you have is really an in 66 it became a big cause. but power, how do we build black power? there were organizations in most major cities asking this question and try to think about it. there were a lot of different kinds of approaches. one important kind of answer to this was to say we are not just going to come its not that we just want to be part of america. america is an imperial power and we need to really challenge that imperialism and part them parcel the anticolonial strug
>> was, wasn't he? first incarnation. unquestionably the most difficult, yes. is -- oakland for sexual harassment >> i was surprised jerry pulled he had no choice. and then what happened is he ended up in europe but he is on his seventh wife. you might not know who are very good friend mamie gruenwald is that she is maybe one of the best political people in washington. her father was the publisher of "time" magazine in its heyday and ambassador to austria. henry married louise gruenwald and is one of the last -- so just when you think you know everybody in new york, you don't she is it. mandy ran all the media for his elizabeth warren and tammy baldwin. the first-time presidential -- so you need to understand she is amazing. >> incredible, fabulous. it's a nice small room. hey, undersecretary. well done. congratulations. are you enjoying at? >> it's fun, yeah. it's hard. >> is the work hard? >> no. i mean technically it's okay but everyone is super smart so i'd have to do my problems and then work on the board. >> i get it. i get it. >> at the same time i'm trying to represe
. >> host: the one in oakland was undermined in you could have the same staying with technology. those who try to use some for.not just actors but i was appalled when i was a kid by voting in the cincinnati reds were elected because they stuffed the ballot box. >> guest: this is the example of medical marijuana more broadly with king of the whole scenario and the people took over. now there are a lot of sites your name has to be real, a real framework common new forums beginning to allow more rational conversation that is often hijacked by the loudest voices. >> host: more questions. a face book can be connected in a dorm room across the road when that get the science departments to build the future for the state and give extra credit. [laughter] [applause] to when you have this experience. you look at government we have the rsi and barshefsky you response for information, response for question, response for proposal, procurement cycle, public hearings hearings, lowest most responsive bid, then it turns out and then mr. is over because new people come in in there with their fingerprints on
is she, by the way? >> oh, gosh. well, he got kickedded out of oakland for sexual harassment, part-timely. >> i was -- finally. i was surprised jerry pulled the trigger. >> he had to. >> no choice. >> he had to. the reports, you know. >> yeah. >> and then what happened is he ended up in europe, and i heard he's very ill. >> oh, that's too bad. >> but he's on his, like, seventh wife. oh, okay. so you might not know who our very good friend mandy grunwald is. she's maybe one of the best political minds in washington. >> yeah. >> her father was henry grunwald who was the publisher at time magazine in its hayday and ambassador to -- heyday -- i'm going to give him a quick briefing, and ambassador to austria. one of the last -- [inaudible] of new york. so just when you think you know everybody in new york, you don't unless you know mandy grunwald, okay? >> i love it. >> she is it. mandy ran all the media for elizabeth warren, tammy baldwin -- >> oh, wow. >> all the -- [inaudible] [inaudible conversations] >> okay? so you just need to understand she's got an amazing -- >> yeah. oh, incre
panthers roaming around oakland with their guns openly displayed. the law to disarm the panthers was supported not just by democrats, the conservatives in california as well and in fact the governor at the time strongly supported why someone should carry guns on the streets in america today. that governor would go on to become president of the united states, ronald reagan. reagan was a big endorser at the gun-control a that many people at the time thought was not designed to control guns, but urban blacks writing in 1967 especially in urban areas they were to restrict access to black radicals in urban areas and ended up sparking a backlash among white rural conservatives who are convinced the government were coming to get their guns next. >> i want to take you forward from there to the debates over gun control and gun rights we've seen in the last five or 10 years. they have become so dominant. there's zero chance of passing in any state legislature or in congress anything that would >> of gun control today. what has changed politically over the past decade or two to put us in th
of newark to the hills of oakland, what inspires me now is so many americans are joining together and looking at the crisis of obesity in america, eating away the foundations of our children, consuming their potential and their dreams, raising the costs of living, lowering the quality of life, i am inspired now with one to another we are joining together across sectors, across parties, across the country, and saying we are going to manifest the will to turn this around. this is the story of america. it is how we have dealt with the most complicated problems, the biggest challenges, the greatest mountains. we have done it by pulling together, not worried about left or right, not worry about this or that, but unified purpose, the old african parable said if you want to go fast for alone, if you want to go far, go together. this collision, this coming together of our community, i believe, by setting specific actionable goals, every week and month and year, measuring our progress, holding each other accountable, accepting collective responsibility, that we will transform health outcom
and prohibition put the best book written about a corporation is by daniel oakland and serves as the basis of the recent pbs documentary series -- bob morrison was the director -- on the prohibition era. hole last segment of the book, the myth of joe kennedy actually being involved. he did make money right in prohibition, more of a speculator than a smuggler, but somehow it is interesting, there is this sort of taken for granted mythology that made this. led. but the real profits years -- [inaudible] and similar family members actually funded the center for european studies at harvard, something many totally respectable legitimate institutions got their start from this, and pushed for a aggressively. so they had this question of origen's and went alleges after prohibition sodas a much bigger story. >> a huge boost for prohibition. they would set out a warning label that said--awarding after six months this is allowed to sit for six months to become alcohol and illegal and people bought it up a storm. they really expanded the industry. was hard to get wine. a lot of whiskey so that was part
community, do this from the streets of newark to the hills of oakland, what inspires me now as so many american are joining together and looking at the crisis of obesity in america, eating away the foundations of our children, consuming their potential and their trains, raising the cost of living, lowering the quality of life. i'm inspired now that one to another we are joined together across sectors, across parties, across the country and saying we are going to manifest the will to turn this around. this is the story of america. it's how we've dealt with the most complicated problems, the biggest challenge is, the greatest mountains. we've done it by pulling together. that worried about left or right. not worried about this or that, but a unified purpose, like the old african parable set if you want to go fast go alone, but if you want to go far, go together. this coalition, this coming together of our community i believe by setting specific actionable goals like every week and monday near measuring our progress, by holding each other accountable, collect data and responsibility that
, in davenport, iowa, in oakland, california, what they can talk at you with one another their expenses after transitioning out of the military. >> fifty. entrÉe, if you could, in vermont a very rare world state, tell me about the peer-to-peer from is important that veterans just as mr. wood blessing, that veterans themselves reach out to other veterans? how do we do that? >> thanks sender. as you know, my team can we have tenfold as to where all combat veterans. we all had struggles, reintegration issues. of all had struggles transitioning back to civilian life. i think in our state with the sugar i don't think it's that severe, the state statement as his active duty big people because you know, i hear on this bill that we talked about unity partnerships. we forged ahead in the state of vermont with a different initiatives that we've stated. we have or director of psychological health that works on the air side and the army side, and that stigma i think is more so on the militant side but as far as the peer-to-peer goes, as you know we go out, we meet the folks speed you knock on doors spea
what it is. >> i have 6-year-old twin daughters in oakland, california. we try to have -- we try to live on the border between the digital and analog, hardcover books and the ipod. we are constantly back-and-forth i just had a piece in the near times and i have to say what it went live at midnight, it was a little thrill, but when i got the paper in the morning and side and print, i thought it could go to mom and dad and say hey, it's not just virtual. it's factual. so there's something for a certain generation. look around this term. we are here. my students are nigeria. how many undergrads are the audience today? thank you. so there's all kinds of digital divides. but in terms of media, my students, undergrads, the hardcover as squier is not in their hands. >> you're the undergrad. go to the microphone and tell us the answer to the question, will you? >> was certain generation doesn't have an investment is for config. like when the near times was like we are a fate now. >> of the mike down. sorry to single you out. >> bring your microphone to your mouth. >> i'm really intereste
in oakland, california, and we try to have both can we try to live on the border between the digital and analog, between hardcover books and the height e everywhere constantly leaping back and forth across that border. i just had a piece in new times in the opinion section, and i have to say that when it went live at midnight, kind of a little through. but when i got the paper in the morning and i saw it in print, then i felt, yeah, i can go to mom and dad. my parents and say hey, i really got in "the new york times." not virtual, actual. so there's something about a -- hey, it's as. look around this room. we are here. it's baby boomers, right? my students are not here. how many undergrads are in the audience today? >> thank you. thank you. >> so there is, there are all kinds of digital divides, right? but in terms of experience of media among the younger generation, my students and undergrads, the hardcover of esquire or rolling stones is not in their hands spend let me ask this young woman are you because you raised your hand. go to the microphone and tells the and to to the questi
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12